Weekly Ratspression™: Montgolfiering

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

montgolfiering verb \mont `gull fear ring

  1. To traipse about aimlessly via hot-air balloon.

Etymology: Montgolfier + -ing

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “Balloons on the Moon” (May 22, 2012).

Example: “What’s a little freaky is that, contrary to what you might think, the “balloons” in the title refer not to lunar montgolfiering but to the text bubbles in the comic strips.”

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While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

Weekly Ratspression™: Monotonized

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

monotonized adjective \mow `not tih nighzd

  1. Deprived of sensitivity, vitality, or energy by overexposure to a lack of the variety that produces interest and stimulation.

Etymology: monotony + -ized [to have caused to be or become]

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “Imagination (or Lack Thereof)” (April 5, 2012).

Example: “Think of all those great ideas that will be coming out of what people think about while being monotonized by this film.”

800px-Imagination-Warner-Highsmith

While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

[Image: Olin Levi Warner, Imagination (1896). Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building, Washington, D.C.}

Weekly Ratspression™: Mentuity

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

mentuity noun \men `two ih tee

  1. relative intellectual acuteness or perceptiveness.

Etymology: mental + acuity

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “Syzygy” (April 14, 2013).

Example: “If my purpose in writing this entry was to highlight the woeful state of my mentuity, I have succeeded beyond my wildest dreams.”

File:V.Solovyov.jpg

While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

Weekly Ratspression™: Mentalosis

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

mentalosis noun \men tah `low sis

  1. A condition of having fetid mental activity.

Etymology: mental + halitosis

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “Wanted: A Breath Mint for Dimwittery” (July 29, 2013).

Example: “Maybe when you swallow it, it will work its way to the brain cells and cure chronic mentalosis.”

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While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

Weekly Ratspression™: Mentalosis

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

mentalosis noun \men tah `low sis

  1. A condition of having fetid mental activity.

Etymology: mental + halitosis

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “Wanted: A Breath Mint for Dimwittery” (July 29, 2013).

Example: “Maybe when you swallow it, it will work its way to the brain cells and cure chronic mentalosis.”

File:Rembrandt - Moses with the Ten Commandments - Google Art Project.jpg

While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

Daily (Semi) Ratspression™: Megalomachiclination

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

megalomachiclination noun \meh gah low ma chih clih `nay shun

  1. A tendency to engage in crafty, scheming, subtle, and/or artful actions based on delusions of personal omnipotence or grandeur.

Etymology: megalomaniac + macho + inclination

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “An Exercise in Chronocide” (May 28, 2016).

Example: “Leo created the Excubes to have his own personal force in case anyone else in the palace started to have megalomachiclinations.”

Fighting_between_Byzantines_and_Arabs_Chronikon_of_Ioannis_Skylitzes,_end_of_13th_century

While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

Daily (Semi) Ratspression™: Meadology

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

meadology noun \ meed `ah low gee

  1. The practice of predicting or “reading” the future through imbibing copious amounts of a fermented beverage made from water, honey, malt, yeast, and sometimes other ingredients.
  2. The study of or specialization in predicting or “reading” the future through imbibing copious amounts of a fermented beverage made from water, honey, malt, yeast, and sometimes other ingredients.

Etymology: mead + ology [a branch of knowledge]

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “Thirsty Foreknowledge?: Try Stars or Bones or Pick-up Sticks” (March 21, 2016).

Example: “We practiced meadology instead, which got us pretty much to the same point.”

Marcantonio_Raimondi_-_Two_Women_with_the_Signs_of_Libra_and_Scorpio

While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

Daily (Semi) Ratspression™: Loquaciosity

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

loquaciosity noun \low quay see `oss sih tee

  1. A natural inclination or innate or inherent tendency to talk excessively.

Etymology: loquacious + -ity [quality, state, degree]

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “Loquaciosity” (April 7, 2012).

Example: “I have deemed such people to have the quality of loquaciosity, a word not in the dictionary at present but that may be at some point.”

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While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

Daily (Semi) Ratspression™: Leximaginator

Today’s “word” from RatBlurt’s Ridictionary™: For When “Normal” Words Fail You.

leximaginator noun \lehx ih `mage ih nay tur

  1. To borrow from Samuel Johnson, “a harmless drudge” who imagines and creates new words and then compiles them into a dictionary (or, in this case, a ridictionary).

Etymology: lexicon + imagination + -0r [one that does a specified thing]

To view the entire blog where this word first appeared, see “On Being Taken Down a Peg (or Two)” (May 11, 2016).

Example: “In it, I credited the somewhat frivolous practice to myself and other leximaginators who strain their brains to come up with new terms when the occasion warrants (or, in my case, when it doesn’t).”

Doctor Samuel Johnson ?1772 by Sir Joshua Reynolds 1723-1792
Doctor Samuel Johnson ?1772 Sir Joshua Reynolds 1723-1792 Purchased 1871 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N00887

While the format of these “words” for the day mimics that of dictionaries, unless you have been reading my blog RatBlurt™, you won’t find these terms anywhere—at least not yet. It is my fervent and extremely ridiculous hope that these terms will one day grace the pages of the Oxford English Dictionary. So, if the source of these fictords [fictitious words] is a dictionary, which it is not, it would be a ridiculous dictionary, hence the made-up name “Ridictionary™” [ridiculous dictionary].

[For something completely different, check out my other website: TNTBAD (Try Not to Be a Dick).]